Headlines

CFA Headlines • January 28, 2014

Headlines to include

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Tell your state legislators that more $ for the CSU is a priority

Our state Assemblymembers and Senators are now considering Gov. Brown’s 2014/15 budget proposal. When they think about their priorities, we want them to remember the importance of investing more money in our state’s public higher education systems.

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Show your support for the CFA Bargaining Team

All CSU campuses are back for the new term this week, so now is a good time for all of us to show support for the CFA Bargaining Team.

Bargaining for the next CSU faculty contract began in December and continues this week. The sides meet this Thursday and Friday.

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U.S. Congressional report details abuse of contingent faculty across the nation

The Congressional Committee on Education & the Workforce, chaired by U.S. Rep. George Miller, just released a report on the results of an online eForum about contingent academic faculty and the findings are quite grim.

The Just-in-Time Professor:

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Early Start report gets an “Incomplete”

The state Legislative Analyst’s Office issued a report required by state law on Jan 14 about the CSU’s much-debated Early Start Program.

See the LAO report

Early Start, which has gone through various iterations since the initial CSU Executive Order in 2010, is intended to accelerate remediation of entering students who are eligible for the CSU under California’s Master Plan for Higher Education but who need improvement in English and/or math.

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Faculty Rights Tip of the Week: The 125% Rule

This weekly CFA Headlines feature offers a brief “Faculty Rights Tip” or short information piece about the faculty contract.

FACULTY RIGHTS TIP:  THE 125% RULE

When faculty are hired they’re often told there are opportunities for additional employment in the summer or other “special sessions.” For many faculty this additional employment is a critical part of their income.

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Links of the week • Jan. 28, 2014

Stanford Economist: Elite Colleges Should Not Give Credit for MOOCs
Jan. 27, 2014—If highly selective colleges begin awarding credit to students who pass massive open online courses created by their faculty members, the institutions could undermine their ability to invest in promising students, according to an analysis by a well-known Stanford University economist. — Wired Campus

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